Writer Beau Smith and Tim Rozon (Doc Holliday) talk WYNONNA EARP

At the roundtable with writer Beau Smith and Tim Rozon talking about Wynonna Earp. Beau Smith has written for every major comic book publisher, including DC Comics, Marvel Comics, Image Comics, Eclipse Comics, Dreamwave Studios and Dark Horse Comics. Tim Rozon, who plays the enigmatic Doc Holliday has appeared in Schitt’s Creek, Crossfire and Being Human. Read more

Frankie Adams & Shohreh Aghdashloo talk Expanse at 2016 Comic-con

At the roundtable with Frankie Adams and Shohreh Aghdashloo talking about the popular ski-fi TV series The Expanse at 2016 Comic-con. Hundreds of years in the future, humans have colonized the solar system and Mars has become an independent military power. Rising tensions between Earth and Mars have put them on the brink of war. Against this backdrop, a hardened detective and a rogue ship’s captain come together to investigate the case of a missing young woman. The investigation leads them on a race across the solar system that could expose the greatest conspiracy in human history.See also my interview with Cas Anvar Read more

Interview with Amber Coney in Dead of Summer

Best known for her work on The Creation of Aspen, Send Me to Heaven and Horoscopes and Fortune Cookies, Amber Coney can also be seen in the upcoming L.A. Series, Kill The Czar, and Actors Anonymous. In Dead of Summer, Coney plays Carolina ‘Cricket’ Diaz, a warm, snarky camp counselor who harbors deep-seated issues beneath her carefree, fun-loving exterior. Read more

An Interview with Flash’s Violett Beane

Best known as the DC Comics superhero Jesse Quick in The CW series The Flash, and as the missing girl in HBO’s, The Leftovers, Violett Beane appeared in the horror feature Flay, and the indie Slash, which recently premiered at SXSW. In Slash, Beane plays Lindsay in a coming-of-age drama about adolescent outsiders who write fan fiction. Beane can also be seen in Tower, an emotionally draining film that focuses on the mass school shooting at the University of Texas in 1966. In this one-on-one interview, Beane reveals some insights about her various roles and how she approached them. Read more

Interview with Radha Mitchell on Sacrifice

A versatile talent with a broad body of work, Radha Mitchell began her career in Australia. She quickly took center stage in the critically acclaimed indies, High Art and Love and Other Catastrophes. Her major film work includes starring roles in Pitch Black, Man on Fire, Finding Neverland and the action blockbuster London Has Fallen. Read more

Interview with Lucy Fry on The Darkness

Known for her various roles in Vampire Academy, Mako Mermaids, Lightning Point, and The Preppie Connection, Lucy Fry has an extensive body of work in both TV and film. Last year, Fry appeared in the indie Mr. Church. This year, Fry can be seen in the popular Australian miniseries Wolf Creek, as well as the time-travel thriller 11.22.63. Read more

Interview with Radha Mitchell on The Darkness

A versatile talent with a broad body of work, Radha Mitchell began her career in Australia. She quickly took center stage in the critically acclaimed indies, High Art and Love and Other Catastrophes. Her major film work includes starring roles in Pitch Black, Man on Fire, Finding Neverland and the action blockbuster London Has Fallen. Read more

Interview: Kate Siegel & director Mike Flanagan on HUSH

Kate Siegel
Kate Siegel

Best known for her portrayal of Marisol in the spine tingler Oculus and for Jennifer in The Curse of the Black Dahlia, Kate Siegel is an accomplished actress with an impressive body of work. In Hush, Siegel teams up with Oculus writer/director Mike Flanagan to create the terrifying thriller of a deaf woman stalked by a psychotic killer in a woods-secluded home. In this one-on-one interview, Siegel and Flanagan reveal the insights and challenges they faced in bringing Hush to life.

Mike Flanagan
Mike Flanagan

Hush is both highly visual and visceral. Where did the concept come from?

Mike Flanagan: Kate and I were talking about thrillers we love over dinner—films like Wait Until Dark—and I mentioned how I’d always wanted to do a movie with essentially no dialog. She reminded me of her recurring anxiety about waking up at night and seeing someone outside her window. By the time we got to dessert, we pretty much had that “aha” moment and that’s were the concept was solidified.

Maddie senses an intruder
Maddie senses an intruder

How was the collaboration between you two? Did you outline together? Write the script together?

Kate Siegel: It was deeply collaborative. Mike would go outside our house and try to break in and I’d have to find a way to escape from him. We’d try out these things in real time, so we nailed down what to do on both ends—Maddie on the inside and the Killer on the outside. When we found something that worked, we’d stop and write down what we liked. After we turned in our first draft, we got some notes from our producer. We then took the script to the Stanley Hotel in Colorado—in room 217 in honor of Stephen King’s The Shining. We went down to the bar and hammered out the second draft.

Maddie senses someone at the door.
Maddie senses someone at the door.

There’s not much dialog, but the sound added so much to the film’s tension and terror. Can you go into the sound design of the film?

Kate: Jonathan Wales—our sound mixer—is an amazing genius who created a soundscape like nothing we’ve ever heard. Even the silences you experience have about 50 different sound levels.

Mike: It was clear going in that the sound design would be crucial for this movie. It was expensively more complex than anything else I’ve worked on. Typically, when you’re doing sound design, you want it to advance the story without calling attention to itself. Good sound design is meant to be processed almost subconsciously in most movies. For Hush, it was the opposite. Sound would be front and center, which meant that noises you typically want to bury in a sound mix—like footsteps, wind or crickets—would be the only thing the audience could hold onto sonically. So we had stretches of the movie where we wanted to imply what it’s like to be deaf. The first instinct would be to simply pull the sound out. But if you do that, all you hear is popcorn being chewed or coughing, and that takes people out of the movie. So our silence from Maddie’s perspective was actually an incredibly dense soundscape meant to give the impression of silence. Some of the noises we used were ultrasound, heartbeats, and the slowed down sound of glacial ice cracking.

Maddie confronts her tormentor
Maddie confronts her tormentor

How did you go about casting Maddie’s tormentor? His icy demeanor and explosive anger turned Hush into a cover-your-eyes nail biter.

Mike: We knew that the mask wouldn’t be on the Killer’s face too long. We wanted to see the human being behind the mask. When the mask came off, it was really important that the person underneath be someone who you wouldn’t think was capable of this. It had to be someone you’d bump into at the supermarket or street.

Kate: And John Gallagher Jr. was a tremendous talent. I was thrilled with his theater work. He was someone you’d never expect as a Killer.

Mike: He’d never done anything like this before. He could always pass as the nice guy. So he was really playing against type. When his name came up for the role, we said, that’s the guy.

John Gallagher Jr.
John Gallagher Jr.

Much of Hush was filmed in what had to be perceived as a totally dark house. What challenges did you face in shooting and camerawork?

Mike: The trick in a house with a lot of windows, and you’re shooting in the dark to light a face, is to basically turn every window into a mirror. So we had to choreograph the camera very specifically. If we deviated from the choreography by even a few inches in either direction, we’d see the camera operator or the boom operator reflected in the window. It’s one of the blessings and curses of a contained movie like this. You have to plan a visually dynamic moving camera in this limiting space without exposing the crew. A lot of filmmakers find working around windows and mirrors very difficult. And that applied to this movie in particular because once you remove dialog, and all the pressure is on the actors to perform without words, Hush became a high wire act for us.

Maddie struggles to survive
Maddie struggles to survive

There’s a saying among soldiers who finally find the courage to fight to survive: “The wolf rises.” What did you draw from to communicate that emotion without words?

Kate: The two years before Hush were very difficult times in my life. So when I approached Maddie, I saw her deafness and muteness as a characteristic. As someone who’s neither deaf nor mute, the only thing I could relate to was the internal struggle of wanting to be heard. I wanted to tap into that very human, very female feeling that the world around you won’t listen. And they won’t let you speak. At a certain point, you say, screw this, I can’t live the rest of my life not being heard. I was feeling that a lot leading up to the production of Hush. So when the time came to “awaken the wolf and let it rise,” I tapped into that feeling of needing to be heard by those around me.

Maddie fights back
Maddie fights back

Mike: There’s a moment in the movie where she kind of rises off the ground, which illustrates your analogy beautifully. We basically shot the movie in chronological order. So by the time we got to that scene, Kate had been working 16 weeks, all nighttime shoots, working in the cold woods of Alabama.

Kate: Unable to make any noise.

Mike: When we filmed that sequence, Kate was already very much in that mindset.

Kate: There was a great trust between Mike and I. I would turn to him after takes, and I would be so angry and uncomfortable that I couldn’t be myself. And Mike would look at me and say, you’re in the exact right place. One thing I like about Maddie: there was this deep well of strength that she captured for the first time and her joy at finding that inside herself.

Maddie has had enough
Maddie has had enough

What were your favorite scenes?

Kate: The scene with Samantha Sloyan, a warm, giving, open actress who played my neighbor. The dialog scene with her was such a joy. It’s a turn from the rest of the film, and it creates a sense of who Maddie really is and how she interacts with people around her.

Samantha Sloyan
Samantha Sloyan

Mike: Mine was the rooftop scene. It was the hardest to film because we had to move the camera on several different levels to make the scene kinetic. But I loved it because the actors did their own stunts. And that put everyone, especially the cast, into this whole new mindset. It was also one of the first times we got out of the house we’d been trapped in. It was a tough night but a good time.

Maddie on the roof
Maddie on the roof