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Last Days Here, a Heavy Metal Doc on DVD

I am not a huge Heavy Metal rock and roll  fan, as I tend to feel more for the Classic Rock style of music.  Actually I am more into music created for film since that either makes or breaks a good movie.  But, I learned to respect Metal after viewing the documentary Last Days Here a film based on the Hard Rock Icon Bobby Liebling. 

Now on DVD Last Days Here takes you on a wild ride into the depths of the rocker’s turbulent past, the ups and downs of a life of drugs and broken relationships to a one more chance at a reasonable recovery.

Directors Don Argott and Demian Fenton follow Sean Pelletier as he works with Liebling and tries to pull him from a certain death.  A lover of Heavy Metal, Pelletier came across an old album of the group Pentagram of which Liebling was the lead singer.  Curious as to whether he can connect with Liebling and find out more about him, he tracks him down at his parent’s house.  Drugged out on crack cocaine and other drugs for 39 years he’s living in his parent’s cellar apartment and has lost all hope of ever getting back on stage.  Determined to bring the Icon back to ‘life’ Pelletier starts on a quest to contact former members of the band with hopes of hearing Liebling sing live.

After months leading into years, he finds some answers to the possible recovery of Pentagram, helps to encourage Liebling to get off drugs, involves himself in helping to restore Liebling’s love life and manages to bring hope where there was only despair.

I really liked the way the film plays out, taking stage archival footage of the rocker that shows his greatness, interviews with past band members and mixing it with the reality of a lost sole. Argott and Fenton don’t hold anything back as they film Liebling up close and personal.  The self-destruction gets very sad, his broken contracts devastating and loss of love overwhelming in a surrealistic world of his own creation, much like his music.  But, they also give you the upsides that show Liebling’s heroic trip to destiny cheered on by Pelletier a believer in miracles that truly do happen.

Outside of some interesting deleted scenes the documentary is the real reason to get the DVD.  Whether you are a die-hard Metal lover or just curious about how someone can rise from the depths after being counted out by himself and those around him, the documentary should not be missed.

The DVD format of the film plays amazingly good through my Blu-ray player and translates nicely on my HD TV.  The film is presented in 1.78:1 Anamorphic Widescreen to preserve the Aspect Ratio of the original theatrical showing.  It has been enhanced for Widescreen TVs.  The Dolby Digital sound works just nicely on my HD Television sound system providing a very good presentation of the rock and roll laced film.

Last Days Here  has not been rated by the MPAA but does contain drug use, language, minor violence, and sexual references.

FINAL ANALYSIS: Heavy Metal fans it’s time to celebrate and lost Icon.

Specifications and additional film information:

  • Cast: Bobby Liebling, Sean Pelletier. Geof O’Keefe
  • Directed by: Don Argott and Demian Fenton
  • MPAA Rating: Unrated
  • Genre: Documentary
  • Running Time: 1 hr 32 min
  • Street Date: July 31, 2012
  • Original Theatrical Release Date: March 12, 2012
  • Language: English
  • Format: DVD
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.78:1
  • Audio: Dolby Digital
  • Video: Color, 1.78:1 Anamorphic Widescreen
  • Subtitles: English SDH and Spanish
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Distributed by: Sundance Selects

 

 

About John Delia

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John Delia has been on all sides of the movie business from publications to film making. He has worked as a film critic with ACED Magazine for 8 years and earned a Bachelors degree in communications from the University of Florida. John is a member of the South Eastern Film Critics Association. Follow John on Twitter @staragent1.

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